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A Slip Under The Microscope

RRP $18.99

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A Slip Under the Microscope is a short story by H. G. Wells. Herbert George "H. G." Wells (21 September 1866 - 13 August 1946) was an English writer, now best known for his work in the science fiction genre. He was also a prolific writer in many other genres, including contemporary novels, history, politics and social commentary, even writing textbooks and rules for war games. Wells is sometimes called "The Father of Science Fiction," as are Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback. His most notable science fiction works include The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, The Invisible Man and The Island of Doctor Moreau. Wells's earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context. He was also from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as at the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views. His later works became increasingly political and didactic, and he sometimes indicated on official documents that his profession was that of "Journalist." Most of his later novels were not science fiction. Some described lower-middle class life (Kipps; The History of Mr Polly), leading him to be touted as a worthy successor to Charles Dickens, but Wells described a range of social strata and even attempted, in Tono-Bungay (1909), a diagnosis of English society as a whole. Wells's first non-fiction bestseller was Anticipations of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress Upon Human Life and Thought (1901). When originally serialised in a magazine it was subtitled, "An Experiment in Prophecy," and is considered his most explicitly futuristic work. It offered the immediate political message of the privileged sections of society continuing to bar capable men from other classes from advancement until war would force a need to employ those most able, rather than the traditional upper classes, as leaders. Anticipating what the world would be like in the year 2000, the book is interesting both for its hits (trains and cars resulting in the dispersion of population from cities to suburbs; moral restrictions declining as men and women seek greater sexual freedom; the defeat of German militarism, and the existence of a European Union) and its misses (he did not expect successful aircraft before 1950, and averred that "my imagination refuses to see any sort of submarine doing anything but suffocate its crew and founder at sea").


Crystal Identification With The Polarizing Microscope

RRP $519.99

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This text describes the theory and practice of optical mineralogy in terms useful to all practitioners from the beginning student to the professional in field and laboratory geology and industrial and environmental mineralogy. The author's aim is to provide the simplest possible access to the most powerful techniques of optical crystal identification. The book emphasizes useful practical theoretical material and methods for studying both thin sections of rocks and immersion of mineral grains in refractive index liquids. It contains original research results found in no other text. A major goal of the text is to allow precise determination of refractive index and the essential composition of crystals belonging to important mineral groups such as olivine, feldspar, and pyroxene. New methods for achieving this are developed for both white light and colored light of variable wavelength. Among the book's unique features is the color fringe chart developed by Prof. Morse for estimating both the direction and degree of mismatch between the refraction index of a crystal and that of the surrounding liquid medium in the immersion method. Further, a new algebraic treatment of the dispersion method allows a high precision of match between crystal and liquid. An original classification of interference figures aids crystal identification. Worked examples of refractive index determination and crystal identification are given for each optical class of crystals. The optic orientation of optically biaxial crystals is illustrated with examples from each crystal system portrayed in stereographic projection. Principles and applications of crystal identification with the dispersion method are developed in a separate chapter. The final chapter is a practical, step-by-step guide to crystal identification in thin section or immersion. An identification table for the most common asbestos minerals, including the dispersion staining method used by most environmental laboratories.


Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis In The Electron Microscope

RRP $347.99

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Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Analysis in the Electron Microscope provides an in-depth description of X-ray microanalysis in the electron microscope. It is sufficiently detailed to ensure that novices will understand the nuances of high-quality EDX analysis. It includes information about hardware design as well as they physics of X-ray generation, absorption and detection, and most post-detection data processing. Details on electron optics and electron probe formation allow the novice to make sensible adjustments to the electron microscope in order to set up a system that optimises analysis. It also helps the reader determine which microanalytical method is most suitable for their planned application.



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